6 comments
  1. Funny, when I saw the phrase "hidden curriculum," I thought of what you listed here. "Curriculum" to me has become the standardized, numbers- and data-obsessed framework that's issued by the state while "hidden curriculum" is, as you said, the actual learning that takes place.

    I'm lucky because I teach English and in doing so really am naturally teaching my students to interpret, criticize, create, etc. The idea that everything is not what it seems is inherent in my subject; then again, it should be inherent in all subjects because as we all have learned in life is "nothing is that simple."

    To drive home the point, I have a sign posted above the door of my classroom that reads: "The meaning lies beneath the surface. The surface lies."

    I'll stop rambling now. This is a great list.

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    1. I'm stealing that sign and posting it in my classroom, Tom.

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    2. Go right ahead. I wish I could attribute it to someone. I got it from one of my own high school English teachers, but I can't remember who said it.

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  2. Excellent list.

    It frustrates me that one must be subversive to implement this curriculum.

    I read this paragraph in today's NY Times. The author is addressing you writers:

    Now try turning a thought into a sentence. This is harder than it seems because first you have to find a thought. They may seem scarce because nothing in your education has suggested that your thoughts are worth paying attention to. Again and again I see in students, no matter how sophisticated they are, a fear of the dark, cavernous place called the mind. They turn to it as though it were a mailbox. They take a quick peek, find it empty and walk away.

    You curriculum will leave them with a full mailbox.

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    1. I hope they have a full mailbox and I hope they will venture into that dark place even if it feels boring, uncomfortable or scary.

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  3. It's unfortunate that these fairly basic ideas have become the hidden agenda. Too often lately everyone is pushing for better test scores and higher grades without cultivating the principles on your list that will serve the students much better. The art of discovery has been abandoned. We should be trying to encourage the students to learn for learning's sake, to make mistakes and to seek knowledge. I believe these things will truly help our students throughout their lives (and probably coincidentally lead to better test scores too). Keep up the good work, John!

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