11 comments
  1. Fourteen? Yet re-read your first paragraph following #14. Perhaps there was a disconnect in your learning of math?

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    1. I'm not really sure where that's coming from. Care to elaborate?

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  2. Absolutely valid points hightlighting the contextual nature of teaching and learning in general.

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    1. Aesthetic versus Commodity.

      Extract from 'Is education a commodity?' http://martygull.blogspot.co.uk/2011/01/is-education-commodity.html

      '... If education is a commodity (a market currency) then places of education are, in essence, the apprenticeships of business and should be funded by trade guilds. If this is so, then education is not a ‘right’ in any meaningful sense. I have the ‘right’ to apply for a job in a fast food franchise, but going to my local ‘McUni’ it is hardly the stuff of universal declarations of human rights.

      If education is the more idealistic encouragement of individual excellence in whatever skills and interests a student shows, this would require a complete overhaul of the current system in order to allow for true ‘differentiation’. Tragically, this was the wasted opportunity of the last decade. I now suspect that neither the political will, nor the money, are available to do this...'

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  3. This post really resonates with me. So often, it feels like everything is made to be black and white and there is little acknowledgement of the shades of grey. My challenge is how to help my students understand the nuance.

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  4. Collective Vs. Individual: We tend to accept that knowledge (and the capacity to learn) resides within the individual, and hence, all testing, assessment and grades are given on an individual basis. We are educating the individual child, instead of helping them to access the massive pool of knowledge and potential that larger collectives have. Collective systems are capable of learning too. Read Steven Johnson's Emergence for an mind-twisting look at this.

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  5. Thanks for your grateful informations, this blogs will be really help for Students blogs.

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  6. It reminds me of the quote by Robert Benchley:

    “There are two kinds of people in the world, those who believe there are two kinds of people in the world and those who don’t.”

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  7. Great post and so true. Inspired me to write about something similar, thanks http://thoughtstreamblog.ca/types-of-problems-in-education/

    Barry Johnson's book Polarity Management also has some great ideas on how to manage the paradoxes you identified here.

    Thanks again for the inspiration!

    jamie

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  8. Your unique points helped me think about this information differently. thanks to share.

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