20 comments:

  1. You missed the point, John. The artist can't paint without a brush.

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    1. Oh, Anonymous, always so quick and poignant with your comments.

      You've managed to restate the point so succinctly that you missed it...again.

      You're right, the artist does need her brushes, pencils, chalk, stage, etc., but with a myriad of tools out there to choose from, the one thing that cannot be replaced IS THE ARTIST.

      Thank you, John!

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    2. Thanks, Jeff! I appreciate you defending the video. I'm not slamming the tools, but pointing out that ultimately the artist has more power than the tool.

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  2. A National Recommended Reading List could have been created decades before most of that technology was created. None of the teachers I had suggested a decent book. But a math teacher was browbeating a kid for not knowing about the best book store in town. I had never heard of it either.

    But the majority of books are mediocre to crap. So why don't we have a list of 10,000 excellent books classified by subject?

    Thinking as a Science (1916) by Henry Hazlitt
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/104611461/Henry-Hazlitt-Thinking-as-a-Science
    http://librivox.org/thinking-as-a-science-by-henry-hazlitt/

    A Short History of the World (1922) by H. G. Wells
    http://www.bartleby.com/86/

    The Tyranny of Words (1938) by Stuart Chase
    http://www.anxietyculture.com/tyranny.htm
    http://archive.org/details/tyrannyofwords00chas
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9H1StY1nU8

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  3. I wish we could get state and national politicians to answer yes to your question.

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  4. Hey, John T. Spencer
    I'm Giorgio Lymon, a student in Dr. Strange's EDM310 class at the University of South Alabama. This was a magnificent short video that described several examples of technology that most people think can fix education. I agree, with you that these tools are very useful but I believe that it all comes down to the way the teacher is interacting with the class. Also, the students are their own tools when it comes to obtaining the information their being taught; I think it all comes down to parenting, work ethic, and the want to succeed.

    Thanks, Giorgio Lymon
    EDM#310

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    1. Thanks for the comment. Teachers are powerful. Sometimes when we don't see results we forget just how powerful we are.

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  5. Tools are important and so are the people who use and create with the tools, but I believe they also need to be working within a correct system founded in correct principles.

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  6. But without the emphasis on tools, how are the tools who peddle their books and PD workshops going to make money?

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  7. Ironic that it took digital tools like a blog, digital video, and even hardware like a projector to downplay their own importance. ;)

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  8. What is the best "App" for education? The Teacher!

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  9. I agree with what you're saying but regardless of your intent, you've just posted a video that many teachers will use to justify their reluctance to adapt or learn new tools. As a computer teacher in an elementary school, it's a discussion I have often. It's true that a Wordle will not save education but a teacher who knows how to harness the power of the Wordle (there's something I never thought I'd have to write) can.

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    1. I am a strong proponent of technology. However, we need to think critically about it. Teachers can see this video and see the nuance. Trust them to be the critical thinkers that they are.

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  10. I don't think the video downplays the importance of the teacher or the technology. It would be like saying that the chalkboard or glue stick is more important than the teacher? Any tool, technological or not, is only powerful if wielded by a skilled teacher. However, skilled teachers can be more powerful if wielding the right tools. Here is my post about it. http://principalarc.blogspot.com/2012/10/its-artist-that-matters-20.html

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